Archive for the ‘Slides’ Category

Last week I spoke at Failing.FWD
Although I speak regular at many events around the world, this was a special one for me.

Partly because it was about failing. Dealing with failure and seeing failure as something positive has been one of my favourite topics since I burned down my parents house in 1991.

Yet that was not the main reason why this presentation was special.
I had a co-presentor. Now for those who follow me, know I make a lot of publicity for PairCoaching, so having a PairPresentor is also nothing new. What made it special, was it was my 12 year old son who joined me on stage.
And we did the presentation in English. A language he did not learn at school yet. So his English is mainly “television & music” English. Ah, it’s wonderful to live in a country where most television has subtitles and is not dubbed.

During the day and the weeks before I received a lot of questions from friends about this presentation, I wanted to group some of the answers here.

How were you invited to this conference?
As Greet De Keyser said in her presentation, people should ask what they want.
When I saw the program of the Failing.FWD conference, I tweeted something like: Damned this is a conference I would have wanted to talk. And then Karen one of the organizers replied: oh you were on our list and we still have an open spot.
Getting what you want, is that simple!

Did they agree on bringing your son?
This is a nice example of “asking for forgiveness instead of begging for permission“.  I’m a professional speaker. It’s my responsibility to make a great talk. I don’t need to ask people if the content or style of my talk is ok.
yes, I did tell Karen I wanted to bring my son and I told her it was possible that he would be on stage with me. I guess, she trusted me. A BIG THANK YOU to Karen, Ann and the full Failing.FWD team for trusting me.

How did you prepare?
The million dollar question.
After I got accepted and before I started to prepare my talk, I received an e-mail from Joppe’s school that the school would be on strike.  So I asked Joppe  if he wanted to join me in going to a conference -that was in English-. I assumed his English would have been good enough to follow a few sessions. He said yes. And he said yes with an enthusiasm, that triggered me in asking him if he wanted to join me on stage. Without blinking he said yes. I replied, you realise we will talk in English, he looked at me and said yes with a big smile on his face. Ah, the youth and it’s innocents enthusiasm.

I prepared this talk like I prepared all my talks.

– I created the draft of the presentation on index cards. (alone)
– Then I rehearsed the presentation using cards (alone) a first time. (And adjusted the cards.)

I did these steps alone, not because I did not trust him.

In 2011 he helped a lot in creating our joined presentation about our life in Bordeaux, I knew having helping me to create the presentation would be a great asset. I did it alone because he still had some large tests at school and my partner did not want that I distracted him. (WorkLife balance is also challenge for him…)

Then I created slides from my cards. I had +40 slides for a 20 minute presentation. Although that scared a few presenters around me, it’s part of my presentation style, which uses a mix of presentation Zen, Pecha Kucha and training from the back of the room.

I tried it a few times alone and then talked with Joppe about it. Just like last time, he had some great idea’s and the presentation grew. And then last Friday we rehearsed a few times & some more on Saturday. The first time saturday morning, was one of the first times the rest of the family joined in watching and he froze. he stopped after 5 minutes and refused to continue.
We talked a little bit about what to do when this would happen at the conference.
I still don’t know exactly what happened, yet I don’t want to pressure him in sharing something that scared him. I did tell him to not worry, if it would happen on stage, I would take over.

Next time we rehearsed the whole family was out. Although they came home while we were halfway, this time he continued and everything was fine.
In the meanwhile I was a more worried about the nr of slides (we had already 50 by now.) I got worried because a lama listening to the name Sofie (or is it a Sofie listen to the name Lama?) asked me about the speed of the presentation.
Sofie is the kind of women that with just a few words turns my world up side down (no, not that kind of upside down.)
I’m the kind of man that has a big EGO, yet I also know that I need to listen to women smarter then me. (I live with two of these)
In the dry-runs with Joppe, I realised that Sofie was right. In some places the speed was wrong.

So on Sunday, me and Joppe we worked on the pace and the order of one part of the presentation. Joppe’s help was crucial here, although at first I thought he did not well remember some of his lines, he made me realise that I got some parts mixed up.
So I went back to my walking desk and started to type out that part of the presentation. It was hard, now Joppe & Sofie were independently of each other partnering up “against me”, yet more importantly in favour of a great presentation.

It was already 15:00 and we needed to leave. I had agreed with the people from Failing.FWd we could do a try out on the real stage.
And then everything fell together, yet when we tried it out, I noticed again it was hard to remember the correct order (remember we had already been practising this talk a dozen times.)
And then I did the probably the opposite of what Sofie would have done, I added 3 more slides. And boom, it felt right. No time to rehearse the full presentation. I uploaded the slides to Slideshare, loaded the luggage in the car while dropbox synced and of we left for Genk. We were half an hour late, yet the lovely Ann Dries from Failing.FWD came out to let us practise on the real stage.

I wanted to do this, so Joppe could feel the stage and I hoped that feeling this he would talk louder. Joppe is rather introvert and when he talks to me, while other adults are in the room, I can hardly understand him. Ok, this is probably partly due to hearing loss as a DJ and some other ear damage, yet he talks rather quite. We practised a full Dry Run, without microphones and with my computer in front of us. I asked him to talk louder then he did and probably wanted.
We agreed with An that we would practise another time Monday morning , now with microphones etc etc..

Although lots of things went wrong (I’ll blog about these in the next days), we had a blast on stage.
Joppe spoke loud enough and it felt to me that the audience loved his style, right from the start.

So it was no surprise to me he got a standing ovation of the full audience.

Thank you Filip Bunker from Pitslamp for the great pictures

 

These are the slides fro my GrowthHacking presentation about hacking my eduction.

With agile going mainstream more and more entrepreneurs, are looking for new ways to organize their company.
When a company goes agile, it has an impact on the company culture.
Some of the smart managers I coach, ask me:

  • what’s next?
  • where can I look for examples of companies that don’t work the traditional way?

This is a list of books & documents about companies that are working in a less traditional way.

Although not a book (yet), the most amazing company I know is /UT7. read the /UT7 story at Infoq
A
nothe rblogpost about how Buffer works as a Distributed company

If you are not in a mood for reading, you might want to watch this video about how open source projects survive poisonous people

Update:
Scott Berkun also wrote an interesting book about the year he worked at WordPress
The Year Without Pants: WordPress.com and the Future of Work

Update 2:
In the year 2014, I want to learn by doing. I would like to join companies with creative (aka non standard structures or ways of working) and help them a week or so. (If they work distributed maybe even longer)

Yves lots of people don’t have the time to read these books. True, will you give me links to articles about these and other companies in the comments?

 

 

At Xp2010 I missed the my agile suitcase presentation. I heard it was one of the best sessions at the conference. So when Martin & Ole proposed it for XPDays Benelux I voted for it. To my surprise they asked me to be part of it.
I created the talk on the train on my way to Agile Tour Strasbourg. I looked for pictures on my way back. I have annotated the presentation, so you can understand it without me doing the talking.

This our my slides for My presentation on the Microsoft Webcafe today at PHL.

– Did you recently joined a new team?
– Do you plan to join a new team in the next years?
– Do you plan to welcome a new team member in your team, in the comming year?
If you said yes to one (or more) of these questions, you should watch these slides and you will learn about the power that a junior team member has.
A power that that senior’s don’t have. A power that will help you to grow yourself and your team.
During the preparation of this talk, with all the feedback I have received, I decide that I should turn this into a book.
If you are interested, please go to the leanpub website and tell me about it..

Today I presented the agile and lean mindset at #Scandev

The version I did was version 17  of this talk. (Update at this moment you still see an older version, as it takes slideshare a while to update the slides. Most of the slides are the same, so that is ok)

This version was designed for this conference, but I have given earlier versions at
ALE 2011 (Version5) :I was asked if I wanted to do a talk about a week before the conference
Lean & Kanban Benelux 2011 (Version 7): I proposed this talk to replace a speaker who had a delayed flight, 5 to 10 minutes before this talk was scheduled.
Agile.Net 2011 (Version 9) : after the good experience at LKB11, I was asked to do this as the closing keynote at ADN11.
Keynote of SDC 2011

(All other versions were internal dry run’s. With my kids or at the companies I was working at the time.)

Like with any talk or anything I do, I offer FLS (Free Lifetime Support) on this talk.

(I decided to only have one version of the slides anymore on Slideshare. That way, this page will always show the last version of the slides.)

A video of version 7  is online

Today I did the keynote of SDEC 2011 (Version 14).
The talk was designed for this conference, but I have given earlier versions at
ALE 2011 (Version5) :I was asked if I wanted to do a talk about a week before the conference
Lean & Kanban Benelux 2011 (Version 7): I proposed this talk to replace a speaker who had a delayed flight, 5 to 10 minutes before this talk was scheduled.
Agile.Net 2011 (Version 9) : after the good experience at LKB11, I was asked to do this as the closing keynote at ADN11.

Like with any talk or anything I do, I offer FLS (Free Lifetime Support) on this talk.

(I decided to only have one version of the slides anymore on Slideshare. That way, this page will always show the last version of the slides.)

Update: A video of version 7  is now online

My professional life started in 1994 by doing software support for a small (7 people) IT company.
The company had a DOS program for insurance brokers. Most of their users were people who did not know much of computers.
Philippe hired me to offer free support to these people. Making his customers life as easy as possible helped the company a lot. We went from a 200 (or 300, I don’t remember anymore) customers to over 1400 customers in little over a year.
When I later started my own company in 1998, I decided I would take this to the extreme:

I offer Free Lifetime support on everything I do.

A few examples to show that I take this pretty serious:

Free support for

At ALE 2011 I did a lightning talk to challenge every consultant or consulting firm to do the same thing. If you support this idea, you can tag yourself with this tag at entaggle

As I love recursive things, I do give FLS to this post about FLS.
my SLA? I guarantee a reply in 48 hours. And usually it’s a lot faster then 24 hours.

And now it’s my turn to ask for help: Will you help me finding someone who wants to create a logo for FLS?

Oh and when I say LIFE, I mean mine, not yours. 😉


Last version of my PairProgramming is like sex presentation.

This presentation was first created as a presentation for students. As they loved the title I kept it. As I don’t want to offend people, the second slide of this presentation I ask the people why they think PairProgramming is like sex.

This is what today’s participants came up with:

  • It’s more fun with 2 (more people)
  • Share feelings warm & cuddle
  • Build knowledge really fast
  • Can make you sick if not done right
  • Discuss what works/what not
  • 2 have more idea’s
  • Requires mutual consent to do it

One thing I added:

You can’t learn it from a book.

You can read the AHA wall on flickr (check for the tags to read the post it’s)

Questions that came up during the course :

  • Can you PP over skype?
  • Do we need somebody to ‘supervise’ the way you do PP ? (Esp in the beginning?)
  • What if there’s no option posibility to use some OS/Computer
  • What to do if there is a conflict between the two, a discussion??
  • It can’t work with any type of character, how do you manage?
  • What if one uses AZERTY and another one QWERTY keyboard?
  • Doesn’t it make it harder to plan a project or resources people (Yves reframed resources to people)
  • Can someone do PP with 1 person and PP for something else with another person?
  • Can you get into “the zone” when you’re PP-ing?
  • Does Promiscuous Pairing kill the flow? (30′ interupts)
  • Why not use PP all of the time?
  • PP= More talking
    =more annoying for other nearby teams?
  • Do you plan who is going to do what or how do you choose whose turn it is?
  • Can you do PP with > 2 people?
  • How do you handle the “Don’t care”?

I answered all these questions during the course, I’m interested to hear your answer.