Archive for the ‘Personal’ Category

Today it’s 25 years ago, that I did something that at first looked like my biggest mistake up till then. I was 19 years old and for the first time in my life, my parents were on holiday without me.

I felt an adult. I had been living more or less on my own the year before at university.

Although 1991, had been a tough year, by the summer I felt like I finally had control again over my life and everything was about to get better. I had again a girlfriend, my parents trusted me to stay home in their house. In my hometown I had been going for the first time in my life to 10 days of partying at Gentse Feesten. And I was doing volunteer work with children at a playground. I felt at the top of my life.


And then 1 august 1991, around 19 hours, fate struck, or was it desitiny?
I made my own French Fries, and with that I burned down my parents house.

I was 19, all alone, no cell phone, without a number to call my parents, no house, wearing nothing but underwear and a pair of jeans. No t-shirt, no socks, no shoes. I went to my neighbor and I called my girlfriend, unfortunately her parents had never seen me, and they did not believe  that a boyfriend they officially did not knew she had, had just burned down a house. Just when you think things can’t get any worse, they do.

I felt very very lonely.

I was 19, although my life was not an open book to my parents, I realized then, there was no way that I could hide this from my parents. And even postponing this, would not help me.
Yes that evening I learned the value of transparency and default to open. 
First thing my mother did when she came home, she did not say a word, she hugged me.  That hug told me; yes you failed, and no you are not a failure.

The newly kitchen burned down before it was finished...
It was a healing hug and it was the start of a long journey, that makes it possible that I can say that for the biggest part of the next 25 years, burning down that house was one of the best things that happened to me.

No, I’m no advising you to do the same. I’m advising you, to look at the failures in your life and see what you can learn from it.
What do you gain from hiding them? Most people gain a life of fear. Fear for being embarrassed. I had just burned down a house and everyone around me, knew about it. I had no place to hide. not literally, not emotionally. Yes there were (Tons of) people that made fun of me. I even had a friend who yelled at me. He yelled because, yeah because of what? It wasn’t clear to me at the time, now I would say, he yelled because of his own fear. Today, I’m ok with it, very OK with it. It told me he was not a real friend. The kids and colleagues at the playground on the other hand turned out to be gold.

Today I will celebrate the fire. Celebrate at work, and celebrate with my family; I’ll make some French Fries and I’ll explain to my son why burning down the house turned out to be ok.

And next time I make a mistake, I’ll do a #FailureBow. If you haven’t decided what to eat today, have some French Fries and think of your failures. 

Hi,

We wish you an exceptional 2016. Just like the last 9 years we want to do this using a self made video about our life in 2015.

During our (Yves & Els) life, our group of friends grew and spread over the whole world.
Although we can’t send a personal mail to each and all of you. We do want to bring a personal message.
Newyear is a moment to make personal connections stronger.  For some that is with family, for some with physical close friends. For us it does not matter if you live in our village or in Australia.

2015 was a moving year, for the world and for our little family. Yves tried to fuse his life and work even more. (He does not believe in worklife balance, he loves work life fusion. ) so he took Joppe with him to talk in Kiev, Sofia and even Antwerp.
Joppe exceded everyones expectations.
All three kids continued to go to CoderDojo and gradually took more friends with them.

We finished 2015 by launching our own android game (www.anguis.be)
Anguis started as a summer parent pair programming project from Joppe and Yves. Programming one hour every day during our summer holiday. And it grew into a full blown family project. Bent and Geike turned out to be real good testers. (I wonder if bringing Lisa Crispin and Johanna Rothman to our house a few years ago had anything to do with it 😉 )
And grand father Ignace came up with a new algorithm to generate our own letter frequency.
And just yesterday Joppe’s Godfather Wim had an idea that made the ergonomics and UI a lot better.

Does this give you a desire to anguis? (yes in our family it already became a verb) we hope so.
www.anguis.be to download the game. (The game itself won’t bug you fro a rating, we hate that just like anyone else, yet we do hope you will give us a rating when you like the game.)
Unfortunately we don’t support English yet. Yes it was designed as a real MVP. In a full lean-startup way we will first add more features gradually grow our audience and once we are happy with the game, we will create a version that lets you choose English words.

Meanwhile Yves has his walking desk for 3 years. He already made 15 million steps since December 2012.
All while he works from home on projects like:
– CoderDojo GENT
– CoachRetreat
– Retroflection
Agile conference calendars
he co-published 3 books

Joppe limited the hobbies in progress and gave up his music lessons in favour of his basket.
Bent switch from circus to Rugby.
Geike took the musical aspirations from her brother over.
And is Els keeping this family together.

That was our life. We are also interested in yours.

Please share with us, what are you most proud of from your life in 2015?

Yves, Els, Joppe, Bent, Geike
Hanoulle – Ryssen

PS: Every year more people join us in making a video. Will you join us this year?
PPS: The kids might not see all the mails we get as answer, they do regularly look at the videos. so if you want to leave them a message, give it a like or a comment. Thank you

My EDC
Inspired by Bart De Waele’s last post a list of what I typically take with me every day.

– an USB headphone, that I can use to talk on Skype when I work with remote people.
– charger for my MacBook pro
– a physical book. I spend at least 1 hour every day on a train, when I usually read a lot. Although I prefer reading in my kindle, I always have a physical book with me as backup.
Jimmy  Cards, to use with teams or individuals.
– a device to do digital banking. (For when I need to make large payments I can’t do on my phone.) I always have a spare one with me.
– a clicker for presentations (Logitec)
– in ear plugs for listening to music on the train or my bike.
Deborah Hartmanns Fearless Journey cards (based on Linda Risings  Fear-less change book.
– My Macbook pro with gothic Snowwhite. (I have this picture to make sure I recognise my Macbook)
Jurgen Appelo’s delegation poker cards.
– A small pack of glass cleaners.
– two adapters so I can work on my laptop with a second screen.
– my kindle.
– my scarf. As a coach, trainer, presenter, my voice is my most precious instrument, you will hardly see me outside without my scarf. Yes even in the summer, I’m very sensitive to wind.
– My kisika (yellow jack), as I drive with my bicycle to the trainstation and I want to set an example for my kids, I will always wear this. (I just realised, left out my bike helmet because it was not in my rucksack. )
moving motivator cards (also from Jurgen Appelo)
– a small set of gongs. They take up very limited space and at least once a week I can use them when I did not expect it.
– post it’s and Stattys. There is not a meeting that I don’t use them. (I prefer Stattys over post it’s)
– a small solar charger for my phone. (I just realised my cable was actually in use when I took the picture)
– a marker.
– a small notebook
– something I use on plane or train to block light on my eye so I can sleep.
– my Iphone 5S (I agree with Bart, I never buy the first form factor of a new device)
– the phone is inside a small cover that also contains the cards I take with me.
– a wireless trackball (that I can use also todo presentations with)
a handshoe mouse: the last two device or some of the many mouses I use. Since I invested in that I no longer have trouble from a RSI that had started.
This are just the things I always take with me.

When I go abroad I also take:
– a powerstrip, so I can connect many devices in my hotel.
– a small bag full of international connectors
– a neck pillow for the airplane
– passport
– a digital photo camera (Canon)

What I don’t take might be as interesting:
– I hardly have cash with me.

 

 

 

 

This year it’s 10 years ago that I started working full time as what we now call an agile coach.
Agile coaching is change management, it’s helping people from where they are to somewhere else.
That somewhere else, is a place neither of us know.
Partly because I don’t know yet enough what is their current place, partly because they don’t understand what agile really means.

 

So one of the typically questions I get is: give me an example.
In these 10 years I have worked for the industry automating food factories, healthcare, postal service, banking, insurance, energy services, consumer service and a few more.
When I gave examples in the first years, I was giving examples about one of these companies I helped.

Yet, when I speak for a few hundred people, most are not in the same industry as most of my examples. And even when they were in the same industry, people came with excuses why my example was wrong for their company. For me that was fine. My examples were never intended to be used as best practises in your company. Their are intended to inspire people, so that they can adapt them and find their own solutions.

So gradually over the years I started to use a different story telling technique.

Most of my examples are now about my family.
Because I consider my audience smarter then me and capable of translating examples of my personal life, to their work situation and find their own solution.

I have the impression this works better.

yes, there still are laggards who don’t want to change and think that some of the new idea’s in this fast changing agile world are crazy and won’t work in their company.
That’s fine. I prefer to spend my energy helping people who want to change, that is still most part of the world.
(And they prefer to spend their time with something they know. That is fine too.)

Look at the picture above: I’m pair working with my daughter. Who is the expert on the picture? yes it’s my daughter. Although I have build a lot more castles then she has, and I have a lot of years more experience, she was really the expert. Next time you are pair-programming , think about my daughter and what you can learn from her …
I don’t even have to explain you what you can learn from this situation. I know you are smarter then me and you will find the lessons you need.

Or as my father says: you don’t have to believe in the sea to get wet, you do have to get in to get wet. Meaning, what you learn of a situation is related to the energy you put in.

If this post inspires you, please share your personal stories. How do you apply agile in your life?

This is the video of my presentation with Joppe at Agile Eastern Europe 2015.

The slides can be found here

The last couple of weeks, I have been in a few discussion (on and offline) around the salary of a scrummaster and an agile coach. (Some inspired by our community book on hiring)
In one of these discussions a European company asked me what would be a good salary for their scrummaster. In another a great agile coach (and dear friend of me) wanted to work as a freelance coach in a new country and had no idea what was an acceptable daily rate. Another company was about to start an agile transition and wanted to find the right balance between paying a decent fee and hiring as many great coaches as possible.

The problem that all these people had, was the only decent information they found, came from the USA and did not feel adapted to the rest of the world. And my personal information is, well is just about me and my friends.  And then my friends Sam & Karen launched their salary survey for South-Africa. I thought, why not launch a similar survey but then globally.

And so I did. you can find my globally survey here

Update:
I received a few questions about the survey.

– Who has acces to the raw data?
Me, Karen, Sam. In the future I will probably ask my father to help me with the statistics.

– Where will you publish these statistics?
The statistics will be send out to the mailing list and then published on my blog.
I will only publish data about countries I have at least 10 people. Otherwise it feels like not statistically relevant. And it helps to keep more privacy.

– What about totally transparency of agile?
It’s always a trade off between transparency and privacy. I know that some people hoped on full acces to this data. I also know that others are really scared about giving data about their income away.

– What countries do you have data on?

Australia (<5), Austria(<5), Belgium(16), Brazil(<5), Canada(9), Chile(<5), Denmark(<5), Finland(<5), France(9), Germany(10), Hungary(<5), India(<5), Israel(<5), Italy(8), Latvia(<5), Lesotho(<5), Luxembourg (<5), Netherlands(6), New Zealand (<5), Poland(<5), South-Africa (<5), Spain (<5), Sweden (<5), UK (8), Ukraïne (6), USA (19).

Most countries don’t have 10 people yet. So I hope more people will make publicity for it. As I really want to publish some nice data.

Feel free to add your question about the survey below. 

yves

I just got back from the first edition of GentM 2015. Today the topic was Social Togetherness.
A topic that I expected to be close to my heart because of one of the speakers Frank Van Massenhove.

I don’t know Frank personally, yet I have heard his story many times and it keep inspiring me.
For those who who don’t know Frank, he turned (one of the) worst FOD (ministries – is that an English word?) around to become one of the hottest places in Belgium to work for.
Inspired by semco, the new working etc…

Many people felt inspired by the talk, yet what also happened was that a few people wondered yeah but would it also work (fill in anything you want…)

Now I have been working as an agile coach for ten years, and more specifically the last 5 years helping large to huge organisations in that role. And then my role is partly a change agent.
Helping to turn an organisation into a new way of working, with a big mindset shift.

I helped companies around EMEA and at the same time I spoke at conferences in many different countries.

Two of the most common reactions I get are:

– yes this is fine in (name another country/company ), but this would not work in (the country /company of the speaker)
– yes this is all nice in theory, but in the real world...

And yes, I have to admit, when I read some books, blogs or hear about company x or y, that I think mm this would not work here.
Well, that never is about the other people, that is me being scared of trying.
And so when you think, what I heard at GentM, or what I read about Semco, or saw in the video of spotify, stop thinking it won’t work here. But look for the smallest step you (not your company, you), can make in that direction.

Thus this mean, I’m never frustrated about where my clients are and the speed they go?
No, I’m always frustrated. I always want to go faster. And that is good because that is my job. The moment I’m happy with where a client is, that means I stayed too long.

The story that Frank told today, is where he is now, and yes it’s the good part. I’m sure there were moments he was frustrated, I’m sure that he still has things he wants to improve and he might even feel they just started. That is not the point.

The first big change assignment I took in a large organisation, I felt frustrated about the speed. I felt frustrated about how little we achieved. I thought I was frustrated because I compared them to what I knew in other companies. It took me a few years to realise that was not really the case.

I compared my clients with:

a imaginary team existing of  
– the best developers from the best teams I worked with
– the best tester from a great team I worked with
– a great scrummaster (who is now working as an agile coach)
– a Product owner that is a combination of two great PO’s I worked with, mixed with the person who taught my PO training and wrote one of the best books on user stories.
– …

mixed with stories I heard at conferences, read online, and hopes I have build up over the years.

so really that is not fair to anyone. None of the teams I have worked with or any of my colleague coaches, will win this comparison. All teams will look pale compare to this imaginary team.

What I started to do instead, is compare my clients to how they were when I joined.
F ex: at my current client, we now have the support of the CIO. That is something that I consider necessary for the kind of change we are trying to achieve now. And I have to admit, one year ago, I did not think we would have this already now. That is a huge achievement.

I can choose to complain about all the possible roadblocks and thing that go slower then I want, and yes I sometimes do that, because I need to let go of my frustration.

yet I love my job, because I am asked to help people to find a better working world.

Just as Frank, I meet a lot of good people that are capable of doing extraordinary things, if we allow them to think. And I know they are capable, because they do it. Unfortunately some of them don’t do it at work, but do it in some kind of volunteer work. And I’m totally not against volunteer work (I’m a coach for coderdojo, and I love helping kids discovering technology), yet I don’t like it when people do voluntary work because they can’t do what they would love to do at work.

 

Ask people their values, give them a why and trust they will figure out the how. (After all you hired them because you thought they were smart.)
Basically treat them as adults.

PS If you think they are behaving as children, ask me at the next GentM, about some of the times I treated my children as adults and what that resulted in… (Thanks Lamazone to ask me the questions that reminded me of these stories…)

  • I read a lot of books, I always have.

As a coach, I decided some years ago, that the books I read as a coach, I want to have in my possession. I decided this because I try to learn something from every book I read.

The number of books that I really have to say, I did not learn anything from is very very low.
During my coaching, I referred people to the different books I had read.
I know that not every one likes to read as much as I do, yet in every organisation there is at least someone who loves to read.

And gradually I began to bring books to the clients I was coaching.
Every company/person has their own proces for lending books.

I call my proces: the library of trust.

Here is how the Library Of Trust works:

  • You select a book you would like to read
  • You take a picture of you with the book
  • You send this picture to my work and personal e-adres
  • You read the part of the book that interest you (mandatory)
  • You bring the book back
  • You ask me to take a picture of me with the book and send it to you (important, that way I have a trace it’s back)

I get two kind of reactions to this proces:

  • Wow cool proces
  • How many books have you lost already?
    Ah that last question is interesting. I also bring my books to the XPdays conference and I leave them in the hotel lobby.
    There I lost 2 books in the last 10 years. One of them came magically back the next year at the conference.
    So I lost 1 book in 10 years.
    The reaction of one of the people that asked me this question. Wow we have a very rigid proces and we loose about 1 book a year. I rest my case.

My friend and colleague Franky Redant said that the SCARF model kinda explains why. Something I let you figure out on your own.

As I wrote in my new years video mail, last year I had two pair of shoes that I wore out. (where I usually do + one yearwith a pair of shoes)
At the start of this year, I bought a new pair of shoes. I went to buy a new pair of shoes in the first weekend of the wintersales. At first, I thought I was lucky that my shoes broke down before. Until I entered my regular shoe shop. (As much as I like to create new habits, the last shoes I bought, I bought somewhere else and you know how that ended…)

I entered the shop and it was -predictable- full of people. And unfortunately in my size not many options for shoes left. Until I found some shoes, that looked different as what I usually buy, yet looked ok. When I put them on, I noticed that inside, the was a little heel. Which basically lifted my foot half a centimetre  (or maybe even a centimeter.) It felt strange, yet the shoes fitted.

Side note: Now I personally am one of these men, who don’t like that women wear high heels. I actually think it’s rather foolish to walk around in stiletto’s of 5 to 10 centimetre. Especially when I see the narrow size of the “heel”.

When I tried the shoes, my thought was, you know what, instead of criticising, maybe I should buy these shoes and try a little bit what it means to wear heels. (Which at the same time felt rather ridiculous as it was only a small heel and it was inside the shoe.) Yes, yes, the stories I tell myself when I buy something.

Next monday, I wore the shoes to work and by the time I arrived, my feet hurted like hell.
I was barely able to move, I don’t even call it walking.
My internal message: “Well yves new shoes always hurt, so …”

Yves this is al very nice, what has this to do with agile?
Great question, let me tell you about an agile transformation I did a few years ago.
I worked for a very big international organisation (think x0.000 people) as part of a 3 persons coaching team. We  were coaching multiple development teams.

There was another team that was thinking up the agile transformation. Some of the people of that team had been with this company for decades and had in this company only been thinking up policies and regulations. (Think project management Office style), some others had agile experience, yet never in this company. Together they came up with some way the teams were supposed to work. The coaches team realised very quickly that what they came up with did not work for the teams we were coaching.

A conversation I had recently made me realise they had split up their company in thinkers and doers. Something that might make sense in a factory (although Toyota shows us it’s not needed to be successful.) yet it for sure makes things harder in a company that does knowledge work. At a more recent agile transformation, we had a similar transformation team only  there the coaches team convinced this team to organise themselves in a similar way as the development teams.
I’m not saying this avoided all problems, yet by walking in the same shoes they asked the developers to wear, they felt the same pain. That created trust in multiple directions.

Reader:
Yves, before you leave, please tell us what happened to your new shoes.

Yves:
Thank you for asking.
In the first week, I noticed that my heels were bleeding. I remember having sore feet, yet I don’t remember bleeding feet. Once the bleeding stopped, my children noticed that I walked strangely (basically put my heels down first and only the my toes.) At some point I realised it was no longer my heel that were hurting, now it was my ankles that hurted. At that point, my partner asked, no begged me, to buy new shoes. She wanted to avoid that I would damage my legs for every. Although I felt I should really walk a while into new shoes, every morning I walked or better stumbled the 1.200 steps to the train station, I wondered what “a while” really ment.
As a change agent, I know I’m asking a lot of people to change their habits, that is why I’m regularly changing my own habits. Asking people in a large corporation to make the switch to agile, is a big change. A change that hurts.

In one of my coaching conversation I had with a CxO some years ago, this persons brain physically hurted. Intellectually this person new it was the right thing to do. yet ignoring the old reflexes gave physical pain.
And that was a person who believed in agile, where a lot of people I’m coaching, are not convinced agile is a solution to their problem. (And who can blame them.) On top, everyone around them, sees they have a hard time, and all these counsellors tell them to stop and good look for a new job. (just like my partner asked me to buy new shoes…)

Now, it’s about a month ago I bought the shoes, my feet no longer hurt. I have to admit, I still realise about once a week, I have new shoes. Which tells me, these new shoes are not a naturally extension of my body yet.
It’s similar, to a manager that is pretty new to agile, although he actually likes it,  when there is a crisis, they automatically start to micro manage their teams, not only honestly believing they are helping, mostly they don’t even realise they started doing it again.

So next time you help someone with a new process, please co-create it with them and walk a while in their shoes before you do. You will see, your new proces is accepted much faster…